Search
Email a friend
  • To include more than one recipient, please separate each email address with a semi-colon ';', to a maximum of 5

  • By submitting this article to a friend we reserve the right to contact them regarding AMM subscriptions. Please ensure you have their consent before giving us their details.


NJ Gov. Christie vetoes scrap metals theft bill

Sep 10, 2013 | 02:48 PM | Lisa Gordon

Tags  scrap metals legislaiton, New Jersey bill, Chris Christie, veto, metals theft, Gilbert Wilson, Lisa Gordon


PITTSBURGH — Recyclers are breathing a sigh of relief after New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie vetoed a scrap metals theft bill, saying punishing metal recyclers is not a solution to the problem.

"Deterring scrap metal theft in New Jersey is a laudable objective. However, I am concerned that significantly increasing record-keeping and reporting requirements on scrap metal businesses will impose substantial expenses and administrative burdens on operators in this state," Christie said in the assembly bill that killed the legislation. "Businesses that abide by the law, especially our state’s small business community, should not be penalized with overly burdensome requirements."

The bill would have restricted cash payments for scrap metals and created an online tracking system (amm.com, June 26). Both measures would have increased operating costs as more manpower would be needed to comply with the reporting measures.

Recyclers in the state were pleased with the action. "We are relieved, but we do our due diligence already to make sure what comes in is not stolen. This was a little over the top," one recycler said.

A second New Jersey scrapyard executive described the proposal as unfair. "This is a common-sense decision by the governor. We are all for putting a stop to metal theft, but how are we to know if a truckload from a demolition job was actually stolen?" he asked.

The sponsors of the bill were surprised by the decision, which was said to have had bipartisan support. "We need to protect our residents, and it has to be done statewide. We will continue to fight for reforms that make it very difficult for thieves to do business in our state," Rep. Gilbert L. "Whip" Wilson (D., Camden) said.




Latest Pricing Trends Year Over Year

Poll

After witnessing the pace of steel plant idlings and worker layoffs during the first half of the year, what is your view of the second half of 2015? (choose one)

No matter what else happens, layoffs and shutdowns, etc., have nearly or essentially stopped for the year.
The environment will change little and the pace of layoffs will continue at a similar rate as the first half of 2015.
The environment will change little yet the pace of layoffs will begin to slow slightly to moderately.
The environment will change little yet the pace of layoffs could exceed the rate seen thus far.
The environment will improve slightly to moderately yet hiring and plant restarts will not resume this year.
The environment will improve slightly to moderately, with hiring and plant restarts commencing.
The environment will improve dramatically yet hiring and plant restarts will still be negligible in comparison.
The environment will improve dramatically yet hiring and plant restarts will only be slight to moderate.
The environment will improve dramatically, with hiring and plant restarts occurring nearly in tandem.


View previous results